Am I Too Young for Hip Replacement Surgery?

It used to be that joint replacement surgery was considered a last-resort option for those of a “certain older age,” but not for those who are supposedly in their prime. Well, you can’t tell that to your joints, and the fact is that they can wear down at any age, including in your 30s, 40s, and 50s. Thankfully, new materials and advanced surgical techniques are rising to the challenge of joint replacement in all adult age groups.

At Metro Orthopedics & Sports Therapy (M.O.S.T.), our team has extensive experience helping patients regain pain-free movement through joint replacement surgery. So, if you’re struggling with painful hips, here’s a look at why joint replacement surgery may be the best solution for regaining your active lifestyle.

The path of least resistance

One of the biggest advances in joint replacement surgery is our ability to take a minimally invasive approach to the surgery. Not so long ago, hip replacement required an open approach in order to provide the surgeon with full visual and manual access to the joint. Thanks to advanced minimally invasive techniques, we only make small muscle-sparing incisions and use patient-matched implants.

What this means for you is that there is far less risk of infection, blood loss, and a much quicker recovery period. In fact, most patients are home sleeping in their own bed on the day of surgery.

On the move

Traditionally, surgeons were cautious about getting you back on your feet after a hip replacement surgery. Thanks to our minimally invasive surgical approach, better implant technology, and our understanding of how the body heals best, we get you up and moving just as quickly as possible.

Evidence shows that starting your physical therapy immediately after your hip replacement surgery can shorten your recovery time and improve your outcome. By letting your body know that you intend to use the joint straight away, it sends in the resources necessary to integrate the new prosthesis more quickly.

Once you get home, we encourage you to keep moving under the guidance of a physical therapist, and many patients are able to walk without an assistive device after just a few days, though it may take three months before you can resume all of your normal activities.

Advanced components

One of the reasons why joint replacement surgery in general was considered questionable when it came to younger patients was the risk of the components wearing out. When this happened, a second surgery was required to replace these parts.

Countering this point, one study presented at an American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons found that a good number of hip replacements in adults younger than 50 are still performing well after 35 years.

Now add these surprising numbers to the fact that we have access to better materials that really go the distance. Although we may not yet have the numbers to bear this out since we can’t fast forward 35 years, we have every reason to believe that these materials will excel in terms of longevity.

You might also consider that even if you get a hip replacement surgery at 40 that requires replacement parts at 80, you’ve gained four decades of pain-free movement.

Ultimately, the determination of whether you’re too old for hip replacement surgery is really up to you. We can do our part by providing you with a full analysis of your hip health and whether a hip replacement can meet your goals.

To get started, contact our office in Potomac, Maryland, to set up a consultation with one of our orthopedic surgeons.

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